Tag Archive: language


::::the bible cut-ups:::: [ poetry ]


The project homepage can be found here.

The bible cut-ups is an on going series of short poems which uses completely deconstructed books of the bible as its source material. Having never read the bible but having pretty definitive opinions of christianity and christians I must say I am enjoying the project immensely. It can be followed live at #biblecutup as I find new hidden truths in that most holy of holies; The King James bible. Feel free to play along at home!

For a thorough overview of the methodology of the cut-up as well as it’s history click here.

Below is a cut-up of my cut-ups so far. Promises to be an ever evolving glorious mess. I’ll probably end up using it as a basis of a short story at some point, or at least a surreal epic poem.

skin thee now. I arise blackish yet not down. Am I myself? Prolong this judement, Touch that and speak of lies.
My father; made of scorpions. Will I counsel him? up your word, roughly. Men offered all but heard not.
My righteous lips forget him utterly.

the breath grew in everyday light.
its seed creepeth all evening –
Sore eyes toward the marvelous; that art of desire shall fall unto me.
LORD. LORD LORD; LORD LORD.
I cometh in thy mouth.
Mercy me.

die, strange children
they hast rebellious love.

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Woke up to find this on facebook linked by Matt Dalby. I found it a really striking and effective performance, its deconstruction of language and repeatition having somewhere between a hypnotic and broken tapeplayer kinda vibe. My advice? Play it whilst getting on with whatever you’re doing and let the rhythms and words tug you about.

Rebecca Cremin lives here.

The Other Room lives here.


Actually, I did know, although I may of momentarily forgotten.

From BoingBoing:

In a Twitter exchange, Anil Dash just reminded me that the word “avatar” comes from from the Sanskrit word Avatãra. The word means, more or less, “descent.” More, from a related blog post at Heritage Key:

But while the modern day meaning implies gaming and interaction, the original definition has a very different meaning. In Hinduism, avatars act as manifestations of deities. This occurs when a god has decided to come to our world by taking a human or animal form.The most well-known avatars were associated with the god Vishnu, who often appeared in our world to restore good in the world when evil threatened to corrupt it. The deity would do so by fighting off demons as a fish or a boar. At other times, Vishnu would lead armies to victory as an eventual king (Sounds a little similar to the plot of the movie Avatar?).

What is an Avatar? Creators Chip Morningstar and Randy Farmer Trace the Ancient Roots of the Latest Buzzword

Bet you didn’t know: “Avatar” is a Sanskrit word – Boing Boing.

19th century manly slang


I am a great lover of slang. I guess it’s really words I’m in love with, but slang has that extra tinge of epic. The more obscure the better. So many strange words, so many strange meanings. urbandictionary is always a good place to look for slang but it’s hardly reliable or terribly accurate – alot of the time you have to dig through a multitude of meanings just to get to one that seems right. I have this idea of filling a script with slang from all over the place just for the love of it. When i first watched Brick I was absolutely hypnotised by the dialogue – although I should note that i had my idea a few years before the film was released, though if it should it made and released I wouldn’t baulk at comparisons. I should also note that those are big fucking ifs.

BoingBoing:

From The Art of Manliness: Classic Skills and Manners for the Modern Man, an absolutely delightful “Dictionary of Manly 19th Century Vernacular.” Some of my faves:

Photobucket Pictures, Images and PhotosAnointing: A good beating. A case for the application of salve.Blind Monkeys: An imaginary collection at the Zoological Gardens, which are supposed to receive care and attention from persons fitted by nature for such office and for little else. An idle and useless person is often told that he is only fit to lead the Blind Monkeys to evacuate. Another form this elegant conversation takes, is for one man to tell another that he knows of a suitable situation for him. “How much a week? and what to do?” are natural questions, and then comes the scathing and sarcastic reply, “Five bob a week at the doctor’s– you’re to stand behind the door and make the patients sick. They won’t want no physic when they sees your mug.”

Cupboard Love. Pretended love to the cook, or any other person, for the sake of a meal. My guts cry cupboard; i.e. I am hungry.

Earth Bath. A grave.

Fimble-Famble. A lame, prevaricating excuse.

Gentleman of Four Outs. When a vulgar, blustering fellow asserts that he is a gentleman, the retort generally is, ” Yes, a Gentleman Of Four Outs”–that is, without wit, without money, without credit, and without manners.

O’clock. “Like One O’clock,” a favorite comparison with the lower orders, implying briskness; otherwise “like winkin’.” “To know what’s O’clock” is to be wide-awake, sharp, and experienced.

Rumbumptious. Haughty, pugilistic.

Snotter, or Wipe-hauler. A pickpocket whose chief fancy is for gentlemen’s pocket-handkerchiefs.

Tune the Old Cow Died of. An epithet for any ill-played or discordant piece of music.

The Art of Manliness Dictionary of Manly 19th Century Vernacular

I’m a total space monkey today. The webs be pulling me this way and that. Youtube is taking me on a slightly nostalgia tinged trip through some old skool jungle. I’m trying out a new brand of espresso coffee. It’s quite nice, more caramel tones than my usual. Finally got back on my novel yesterday after weeks of self-defeating blockage, which is good. Sometimes you just gotta start a new chapter and come back.

I gotta be going….


It has no fixed meaning, and thus applies to virtually anything the user wishes to demonize, while excluding the user’s own behavior and other acts one seeks to justify.  All of this would be an interesting though largely academic, semantic matter if not for the central political significance with which this term is vested:  both formally (in our law) and informally (in our political debates and rhetoric).

Salon Radio: Manipulative use of the term “Terrorism” – Glenn Greenwald – Salon.com.

An ode to the octopodes


Octopuses? Octopi? Octopodes? I cannnot rest until I know for sure!!!!


The last speaker of an ancient language in India’s Andaman Islands has died at the age of about 85, a leading linguist has told the BBC.

Professor Anvita Abbi said that the death of Boa Sr was highly significant because one of the world’s oldest languages – Bo – had come to an end.

She said that India had lost an irreplaceable part of its heritage.

Languages in the Andamans are thought to originate from Africa. Some may be 70,000 years old.

The islands are often called an “anthropologist’s dream” and are one of the most linguistically diverse areas of the world.

‘Infectious’

Professor Abbi – who runs the Vanishing Voices of the Great Andamanese (Voga) website – explained: “After the death of her parents, Boa was the last Bo speaker for 30 to 40 years.

Map

“She was often very lonely and had to learn an Andamanese version of Hindi in order to communicate with people.

“But throughout her life she had a very good sense of humour and her smile and full-throated laughter were infectious.”

She said that Boa Sr’s death was a loss for intellectuals wanting to study more about the origins of ancient languages, because they had lost “a vital piece of the jigsaw”.

FROM BBC WORLD SERVICE

“It is generally believed that all Andamanese languages might be the last representatives of those languages which go back to pre-Neolithic times,” Professor Abbi said.

“The Andamanese are believed to be among our earliest ancestors.”

Boa Sr’s case has also been highlighted by the Survival International (SI) campaign group.

“The extinction of the Bo language means that a unique part of human society is now just a memory,” SI Director Stephen Corry said.

BBC News – Last speaker of ancient language of Bo dies in India.
via Arthur Magazine blog

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